Haibun Thinking – Memories Lost, like tears in the rain!

This week in the Haibun Thinking writers challenge, one of the choices for the prompt is the following phrase:

“All those moments will be lost in time… like tears in rain.”
~ Rutger Hauer (Blade Runner, movie)

My entry:

rainydayblues

Memories

So precious our memories, yet often only to each of us, as we recall specific moments from our life. Although our lives are shared with family and friends our memories are individual to our perspective of the experiences we’ve had. The accumulation of memories seems lonely on the one hand, yet personal and private on the other.

I wonder … if it were possible, would I share my feelings I’ve had so far in my life … would I? Not dreary ones, or sad or bad ones, but the most glorious and wonderful ones. I’m not referring to a discussion on time and events that occurred but the ability to pass on actual emotions being felt in those moments. It might be a very grand thing.

It does seem, whether our experiences are fleeting or of some duration, each memory is categorized in our mind according to our very personal feelings or emotions of said experience. And while these memories of significant past events are rarely forgotten to us, it is a bit sad that they exist mostly within our own individual minds, to be lost in time like tears in the rain.

life’s cherished moments

fleeing endlessness of time

sadly forgotten

*

While the video/movie is distinctly dystopian in nature, there is a valuable thread running through the whole. About people, life, our feelings, our reason and need to feel needed … of a purpose and to have shared those feelings with others. My haibun this week was based on those feelings.

Haibun Thinking is an excellent (weekly) opportunity for writers to stretch their writing skills. For more information click HERE. Your talented and friendly host, Alastair, will get you started. Be sure and click on the blue link icon to read other entries, while you’re there!

Thank you for stopping by, hope you enjoyed,

~ Penny

The forgotten flower

meadow flowers

~

Lost amidst the meadow’s view

forgotten flower poised so true.

Lingering in the morning air

none to breath thy fragrance fair.

Silked, unfolded petals wide

forgotten flower, you abide.

~

Forgotten flower still unseen

and yet you reign, you are a queen.

For unbeknownst to all this day

crowned with sunshine’s golden rays.

 Morning dew with sparkling glow

jeweled petals did bestow.

~

You’ve become a radiant sight

although unseen, your glory’s bright.

Unfortunate who cannot see

unwitnessed still, for all you be.

Forgotten ’til there does appear

someone of worth who’ll hold your dear.

Forgotten flower never fear

your time for view is coming near!

~

morning dew

~

“All have beauty under the sun,
especially those forgotten ones
A forgotten flower should not be,
if we chose to – we will see”

Penny L Howe, 2013

~

Happy Weekend, everyone

~ Penny

Snapshot_20120917

The Dying Place or a Loving Responsibility

There are those (many) that begin to need assistance as their age advances.Some time ago I was hired to produce a resource guide that would be a state publication. Its purpose, to assist family members in finding the information and resources needed to care for an aging member.

As a part of the project I went to many different establishments involved in the care of senior citizens.

The one I remember most was my visit to an assisted living residence. As I sat waiting to interview the manager there, seated near me was an older gentleman in a wheelchair, he had on a cowboy hat, wore cowboy boots, and had a rough weathered face. He looked to be quite a character.

I pleasantly said “Hello”. And he responded back. We began to talk. He told me he’d been a cowboy and had worked on a ranch for many years until he got his “bum leg” Which he tapped for me to see. He asked me if I was visiting someone there. I said no and explained why I had come to see the manager, to gather information about amenities and the services available.

He laughed. But it was a hollow sort of laugh and then he said softly in the loveliest low timber of voice, “Oh I can tell you everything you need to know”. He went on “This here’s the waiting place.”

“A waiting place” I asked? Curious as to his meaning. “Yup,” He replied, “it’s where you come to wait.” I wanted to understand what he meant by that so I said, “The waiting place?” And he answered. “Well, as I’ve got it figured out,” He paused a moment and then continued, “this is the place you come to wait until it’s time to go to the dying place.”

I knew where this was going but I couldn’t help myself so I said “The dying place?”

And he answered, looking directly into my eyes while he spoke. “Yes, the dying place, with rows of beds and nurses who come and go and you’re left alone to slowly die.

I did not make this up. This is a true story. He had accepted his lonely fate as he did not want to be a burden to his family. A BURDEN TO HIS FAMILY. If you haven’t visited any “residences”, care facilities, or nursing homes recently, I suggest you do so. It is a sad commentary on what has not only become permissible but is now considered to be the right thing to do in the enlightened country of the USA.

When we are young, most of us, are nurtured by the adults of our family, cared for and supplied with much of what we need to grow up and become responsible loving adults. Why is it then that those who did the caring when we were young do not receive the same love and care from their family when they become old? Why is caring for our elderly considered a “burden” when caring for our children is a “loving responsibility? …Why?Addendum:

I published this post last night, North American time, around midnight. I have received some very caring, concerned and loving comments responding to this post today. This afternoon, one comment in particular stood out from the rest, so compelling that I felt the need to add it here for all to see. Please read:

Christina ~

July 20, 2012 at 1:47 pm

I read some very powerful words a long time ago…wish I could remember where. The point — We send our little ones off to daycare and our elders off to nursing homes….we are a generation that lives perpetually in the present…no future (little ones) and no past (elders). It is a sad heartbreaking truth.

I (a new single mom) understand that having little ones and the need to care for elders can be more than challenging…but even a thoughtful gesture towards those that paved the way before us…visiting them, playing a game, reading…talking and learning…feeling loved and appreciated and most importantly feeling “needed”.

Every one of us has a unique story…and it breaks my heart that some stories are put away to be forever forgotten instead of valued, shared, cherished, and added to not only this but also future generations.

Yes, a tough situation…but if we each did a very small act, even once in a while…what a difference that would make!